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Post-operative pain after laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for Crohn’s disease: a case control study

Journal Volume 84 - 2021
Issue Fasc.2 - Original articles
Author(s) K. McKevitt 1, S.M. Sahebally 1, S. Patchett 2, A. O’Toole 2, S. Galvin 3, J. P. Burke 1
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PAGES 271-274
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DOI10.51821/84.2.271
Affiliations:
(1) Departments of Colorectal Surgery, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland
(2) Department of Gastroenterology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland
(3) Department of Anaesthesia, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9, Ireland

Aim: Surgery for Crohn’s disease (CD) is characterized by an enhanced inflammatory response. While inflammation can induce hyperalgesia, post-operative pain following surgery for CD has not been characterized. This retrospective study compared a consecutive series of patients undergoing laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for CD and neoplasia performed by a single surgeon.

Method: Elective resections performed between Jan-2016 and Aug-2017 managed in an enhanced recovery pathway were eligible for inclusion. Patients were excluded if open surgery was performed, an ileostomy was fashioned, no patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was used or data were incomplete. Results : 38 cases were included, 20 for neoplasia and 18 for ileocolonic CD. There was no difference in patient gender (P=0.520). CD patients were younger (39.8±2.8 Vs 77.2±2.1 years, P<0.001) but had an equivalent length of resection (312.9±43.5 Vs 283.3±71.7 mm, P=0.915). CD patients had higher pain scores on post-operative day 1 (6.8±0.8 Vs 2.6±1.0, P<0.001), day 2 (5.0±0.5 Vs 1.6±0.9, P<0.001) and day 3 (4.1±0.6 Vs 1.3±0.7, P=0.008). CD patients used their PCA for longer (85.7±16.3 Vs 47.7±4.2 hours, P=0.017) and used a greater total amount of morphine (148.6±33.8 Vs 37.0±7.8 mg, P<0.001). Post-operative CRP was higher in patients with CD on day 1 (P=0.011), day 2 (P=0.001), day 3 (P=0.001) and day 4 (P=0.007), but no leak or intra-abdominal abscess occurred in either group.

Results: 38 cases were included, 20 for neoplasia and 18 for ileocolonic CD. There was no difference in patient gender (P=0.520). CD patients were younger (39.8±2.8 Vs 77.2±2.1 years, P<0.001) but had an equivalent length of resection (312.9±43.5 Vs 283.3±71.7 mm, P=0.915). CD patients had higher pain scores on post-operative day 1 (6.8±0.8 Vs 2.6±1.0, P<0.001), day 2 (5.0±0.5 Vs 1.6±0.9, P<0.001) and day 3 (4.1±0.6 Vs 1.3±0.7, P=0.008). CD patients used their PCA for longer (85.7±16.3 Vs 47.7±4.2 hours, P=0.017) and used a greater total amount of morphine (148.6±33.8 Vs 37.0±7.8 mg, P<0.001). Post-operative CRP was higher in patients with CD on day 1 (P=0.011), day 2 (P=0.001), day 3 (P=0.001) and day 4 (P=0.007), but no leak or intra-abdominal abscess occurred in either group.

Conclusions: CD patients experience increased post-operative pain, require more post-operative analgesia and have an enhanced post-operative inflammatory response. Further studies to elucidate the mechanism of this hyperalgesia and strategies to obviate it are required.

Keywords: Crohn’s disease, surgery, pain, analgesia, inflammation.

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.
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